James Frank.

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Shout outs to The Jackal. Pretty solid list. Kubrick is the gawd. Melville's Le Cercle Rouge and Army of Shadows are some of my all time favorites. Kurosawa is the homeboy, too. High and Low and Ikiru are incredible. Jarmusch also gets plenty of love over here too. Scorcese and Hitchcock are wonderful as well.

Verhoeven's RoboCop has been and always will be my favorite movie. The director's cut is a perfect movie. The satire and social commentary manages to be interesting and thought-provoking without interrupting any of the ridiculous violence and action. Usually with films of that era, you'd have to settle for one over the other, but RoboCop covers it all beautifully. Big ups to Total Recall too.

Directors I like to name drop to sound cool and cultured: Seijun Suzuki (Don't sleep), Aki Kaurismaki, Michael Werner-Fassbinder, Andrei Tarkovsky, Robert Bresson. John Carpenter, David Fincher, Brian De Palma and John Frankenheimer are cool Americans.

While I'm on my soapbox, any new movies you guys are looking forward to? Birdman and Calvary have been on my radar for some time, and I still (shamefully) haven't seen The Wind Rises or Under The Skin.

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any new movies you guys are looking forward to?

The Rover, as someone has already mentioned.

Sin City 2

Locke (Tom Hardy flick)

Foxcatcher

The Zero Theorem (new Terry Gilliam flick)

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I like lots of the same directors as you guys. Glad Kurosawa was mentioned among the other greats.

One that has not been mentioned, who I think is great is Errol Morris.

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directors i like

-jonathan glazer (sexy beast, under the skin)

-pt anderson (the master, there will be blood, magnolia, boogie nights)

-wes anderson (everything he's done)

-noah baumbach (the squid and the whale, fances ha)

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looking forward to:

Frank

A Most Wanted Man

Kingsman

Interstellar

and it should be interesting to see if The Interview sparks off WW3 lol.

I'm a sucker for almost anything with Rogen, Seigel, Rudd et al in it.
Laughter is the best medicine.

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favorite directors. in no particular order. and im sure im forgetting lots

------------------------

david lynch

tim burton

takeshi miike

terry gilliam

ingmar bergman

paul thomas anderson

hayao miyazaki

satoshi kon

luis bunuel

jean-pierre jeunet

alejandro gonzalez inarritu

stephen chow

keenen ivory wayans

john hughes

john carpenter

woody allen

john landis

martin scorsese

sam raimi

------------------------

and yeah; definitely looking forward to birdman!

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Sherrybaby

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I was having a long ass Kubrick discussion with my buddy this past weekend and he told me some stuff about The Shining I never knew. Apparently, the movie's deeper theme is about the plight of the Native Americans at the hands of European settlers and later generations of Anglo-Americans. He told me about the fact that as Nicholson's character goes crazier and crazier he starts dressing in more and more reds, whites, and blues while his wife and son start wearing more and more Earth toned colors. He also told me to keep an eye out for the symbolism represented by all the art on thr walls depicting Native Americans; especially the mural he is throwing the ball against. Any of y'all ever hear or read about that aspect of the film? One of the most interesting things I learned though was that the way Kubrick filmed the movie he essentially made the architecture of the hotel completely unrealistic; putting rooms, staircases, etc. in places where it would be logistically impossible for them to exist which subconsciously adds to the creepiness of the structure as a whole.

My buddy let me borrow his Kubrick collection box set so I'm excited to rewatch a lot of his movies, most of which I haven't seen in the last ten years.

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Good looks! I'm definitely gonna tell my friend about this. He'll love it.

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I really did not take 237 all that seriously , as a lifelong fan of Kubrick. But the Native American themes are a bit too difficult to miss. I did take note of some parallels to Native American religion. The part where Danny comes out of the room with his father and there is an inference that jack was molesting him and then jack starts to chase his wife is pretty freaky. They end up running across a bearskin rug. Some weird late 70s shit right there. I understand the mind of Kubrik and have read more than my share; I don't believe the imagery to be as prominent as these assholes make it. Dudes who make films like these are massive wankers and have no real understanding of neither theology nor mythology.

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The bouncing the ball part is interesting as well and we start to see more Native American tapestries hung on the wall (seems Hopi to me: a lesser aggressive tribe) and he starts throwing a racquetball against the wall in a rhythmic pattern.

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back to room 237 eh?

as an obsessive The Shining-viewer myself, I loved it. However, I think that to pin it down as being any one thing (that the film at its core has a specific message about whatever, native americans for example) is a mistake and I'll bet Kubrick would have laughed out loud. Not that all that stuff isn't in there, but I think it's truly a masterpiece of mind-games and suggestion. One of the Room 237 dudes goes on about how Kubrick read up on subliminal advertising techniques before the film, and it comes across as kind of far-fetched the way he presents it, but in my opinion Kubrick laid in an almost endless amount of "clues" that mostly just lead to the dead-ends of speculation. IT'S LIKE A LABYRINTH OR EVEN A HEDGE MAZE. So yeah, the native american stuff is in there, but there's also stuff like the fact that the typewriter changes brands halfway through...

Sunny you'll probably appreciate the bit about the "impossible window" in Ullman's office, which is located in the middle of the hotel and would not have a window at all let alone a large bright one. When I had that pointed out to me, I really suspected that its subliminal effect had been working on me for years without knowing why.

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Spike Lee's Inside Man is so great. Some of the lines are just great:

Madeliene White: Well, I'd love to tell you what a monster you are, but, uh, I have to help Bin Laden's nephew buy a co-op on Park Ave.

Arthur Case: [laughing] If that were true, you wouldn't tell me.

Madeliene White: [turning to leave] We're listing you as a reference.

Vikram Walia: Fuckin' tired of this shit. What happened to my fuckin' civil rights? Why can't I go anywhere without being harassed? Get thrown out a bank, I'm a hostage, I get harassed. I go to the airport, I can't go through security without a random selection. Fuckin' random, my ass.

Keith Frazier: I bet you can get a cab though.

Vikram Walia: I guess that's one of the perks.


My favorite film is Passion of the Christ. I'm a big fan of Godjesus and Mel Gibson.

Broking... is that you?

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Man, how the hell did I forget about Inside Man?!?! I think its such a non-Spike Lee joint and more in the vain of a 'typical' Hollywood movie that I forget he put that masterpiece together. Anyone know how far in development the sequel is? Or did that project get shelved?

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I think it has been shelved a few times...

“I haven’t made a feature film in three years… Inside Man was my most successful film… But we can’t get the sequel made”, the filmmaker told Charlie Rose. ”And one thing Hollywood does well is sequels. The film’s not getting made. We tried many times. It’s not going to happen… But money is a big part of film, unlike a lot of other art forms.”

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Too hard to go wrong: cassavetes; Kazan; Fellini; Kurosawa; jarmusch; Kubrick; Hitchcock; Eastwood.

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So I'm sure most of you know that the intro to Liquid Swordz was taken from Shogun Assassin, it was also featured in Kill Bill Vol 2. But some of you might not be aware that Shogun Assassin is actually a mash up of two of the Lone Wolf & Cub films, re-edited and dubbed for American audiences.

Shi-ni-Kaze-ni-Ubaguruma-B2-copy.jpg

There are six films in the Lone Wolf & Cub series and really are amazing pieces of Samurai cinema. So much dopeness in these films from the crazy inventive weaponry of the baby cart, the geisers of blood, to the sheer badassery of Ogami Itto. Shogun Assassin is great but I highly recommend watching the entire original series.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nWphTaQRd1k

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Eastwood.

forgot about him. those two war flicks were pretty awesome even if most people did not watch the second one... and Unforgiven!

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I think it has been shelved a few times...

I havent made a feature film in three years Inside Man was my most successful film But we cant get the sequel made, the filmmaker told Charlie Rose. And one thing Hollywood does well is sequels. The films not getting made. We tried many times. Its not going to happen But money is a big part of film, unlike a lot of other art forms.

Damn. Thanks for the update though. I was always torn on whether or not a sequel to that should have been made. One side of me would have loved to see more of Frazier but the other side thinks that movie was too perfect to try to go back and add on to.

I totally second Projexion's Shogun Assassin recommendation. My buddy ordered the DVD when we were in high school and we were the only cats on our circle who knew about the sheer ridiculous amount of heads getting chopped off and that amazing baby cart of death. Did you know that the graphic novel turned feature film The Road to Perdition is an adaptation of the Lone Wolf and Cub series? I have both formats and in the introduction to the graphic novel the author flat out credits the LW&C series as his inspiration for tweaking the real life events of some mobsters in the Midwest during the Prohibition era.

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Anyone have the Barnes and Nobel Criterion sale going on where they're at?

I just picked up:

-Throne of Blood

-Paths of Glory

-Medium Cool

-The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp

-House

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I was having a long ass Kubrick discussion with my buddy this past weekend and he told me some stuff about The Shining I never knew. Apparently, the movie's deeper theme is about the plight of the Native Americans at the hands of European settlers and later generations of Anglo-Americans. He told me about the fact that as Nicholson's character goes crazier and crazier he starts dressing in more and more reds, whites, and blues while his wife and son start wearing more and more Earth toned colors. He also told me to keep an eye out for the symbolism represented by all the art on thr walls depicting Native Americans; especially the mural he is throwing the ball against. Any of y'all ever hear or read about that aspect of the film? One of the most interesting things I learned though was that the way Kubrick filmed the movie he essentially made the architecture of the hotel completely unrealistic; putting rooms, staircases, etc. in places where it would be logistically impossible for them to exist which subconsciously adds to the creepiness of the structure as a whole.

My buddy let me borrow his Kubrick collection box set so I'm excited to rewatch a lot of his movies, most of which I haven't seen in the last ten years.

I've heard that interpretation before, and think it's probably the most accurate popular interpretation of the Shining. One thing I read a few months ago that I found interesting was a deliberate, curious departure from the book. Apparently in the book the family drives to the hotel in a red Volkswagen, and in the movie the Volkswagen is yellow. However, there is a shot somewhere in the middle of the film where we see a junkyard type area near the hotel and a wrecked red Volkswagen is among the junkyard. Kubrick was a mastermind, and sometimes it's hard to decipher what he was intending. Which is partially what makes his work so interesting. He once stated in an interview that he believed audiences loved little enigmatic details in films.

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Anyone have the Barnes and Nobel Criterion sale going on where they're at?

I just picked up:

-Throne of Blood

-Paths of Glory

-Medium Cool

-The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp

-House

tempting, very tempting, especially the Yojimbo & Sanjuro combo

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tempting, very tempting, especially the Yojimbo & Sanjuro combo

It's really a beautiful box set. Can't beat half priced Criterions. Unless you can find them used and in good condition.

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One that has not been mentioned, who I think is great is Errol Morris.

Errol Morris is the man. I almost picked up a Brief History of Time yesterday as well. The Thin Blue Line is excellent. I also really like Les Blank. His documentaries are usually short simple portraits, but I find that they usually capture the unique personality of the subjects being shown.

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It's really a beautiful box set. Can't beat half priced Criterions. Unless you can find them used and in good condition.

86 dollars later: Yojimbo / Sanjuro, Hidden Fortress, & Seven Samurai. Thanks for the heads up, but I got stop with the online purchases for awhile...

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86 dollars later: Yojimbo / Sanjuro, Hidden Fortress, & Seven Samurai. Thanks for the heads up, but I got stop with the online purchases for awhile...

Haha I almost picked up Hidden Fortress as well. I always get carried away with the Criterion sales. I think there's two a year at BN. So the next one will probably be around November/December. Gonna start saving now lol.

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