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New J DIlla album, The Diary

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http://www.wonderlandmagazine.com/2016/04/j-dillas-last-album-conversation-eothen-alapatt/

W: Is this a high point of his rapping?

A: Well you know I’m a big fan of Dilla as a rapper, I know not everybody is…I hear this, and I hear a swing that I don’t hear in many MCs before or after. I think Dilla is a tremendously capable rapper, but I know not a lot of people are going agree with me. Dilla let space occur naturally and we could hear the breathing in his music. A lot of people who are into rippity-rap don’t like that, they want every bar to be filled up with something…that you have to be showing technique. But Dilla knew that technique was also about letting go, pulling back and not showing everybody what you could do.

W: I guess using voice as sound?

A: And articulating moments in the beat, because that’s what the rapping producer does as well as anything. An exclamation point here, question mark here, comma, colon, semi colon, all of that. I think Dilla was tremendous at that.

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http://www.wonderlandmagazine.com/2016/04/j-dillas-last-album-conversation-eothen-alapatt/

W: Is this a high point of his rapping?

A: Well you know I’m a big fan of Dilla as a rapper, I know not everybody is…I hear this, and I hear a swing that I don’t hear in many MCs before or after. I think Dilla is a tremendously capable rapper, but I know not a lot of people are going agree with me. Dilla let space occur naturally and we could hear the breathing in his music. A lot of people who are into rippity-rap don’t like that, they want every bar to be filled up with something…that you have to be showing technique. But Dilla knew that technique was also about letting go, pulling back and not showing everybody what you could do.

W: I guess using voice as sound?

A: And articulating moments in the beat, because that’s what the rapping producer does as well as anything. An exclamation point here, question mark here, comma, colon, semi colon, all of that. I think Dilla was tremendous at that.

Thanks for the read!

Man I always loved Dilla's rappin'....people be trippin' cause they think writing a good verse just comes down to the rhyming - well you wrong muthafucka, go study some literature, there are more elements to a verse than just rhymes. That's why I hate people who are dickriding 2pac saying he is the best lyricist ever (people who are not actually into rap but they think they are because they listen to 2pac and Biggie) - how the fuck can you be the best lyricist when your vocabulary has been roughly made up of 50 words during your whole career(!!!!!!!!), revolving around the same subjects all the goddamn time (penitentiary, thug life, dear mama, lord knows).

No disrespect to him, it's just that it's hard for me to consider him one of the best knowing that there are more skilled MCs out there when it comes to lyricism. I get it that his songs have an emotional side to it which people try to relate to and that's why they like it, but that's not something that makes him a great lyricist IMO.

Just being honest here.

I also know a lot of people would come at me for saying this but I don't really care, it's not my problem they can't comprehend a verse that has a deeper figurative meaning.

As Dilla himself said on the PPP - Act Like You Know track (one of his best lyrically) - 'Holla at your boy he don't just produce beats'

I love Dilla's rhythmic delivery (the punctuation, pauses and how he switches his tempo to match the beat) as well as his witty metaphors and references.

Peep this one from Let's Take It Back:

'I'm like the Professional....makin' my hits collectin' my dough'

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yeah it was a good interview;great answers by egon

regarding the intent and purpose of the project. loved that

he stresses that dilla's work is very much alive and

hasn't lost its' vibrancy/potency with the passage of time &

the evolution of music

as for 2pac...

pls dont discard him (&more specifically his rapping) so easily.

he definitely has his place in rap,but thats completely

another discussion.

dilla's influence on rappers is highly understated but thats another

post entirely:)

my favorite dilla get-busy verses:

thelonious

give it up

shake it down/dewit

raise it up

do ya thang

we gangsta

no games

game over

shotgun

f the police

wild

reunion

ice

da ruckus

door

the introduction

n#%* know

filth

all champion sound

and ruffdraft raps

am i missing anything?

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yeah it was a good interview;great answers by egon

regarding the intent and purpose of the project. loved that

he stresses that dilla's work is very much alive and

hasn't lost its' vibrancy/potency with the passage of time &

the evolution of music

as for 2pac...

pls dont discard him (&more specifically his rapping) so easily.

he definitely has his place in rap,but thats completely

another discussion.

dilla's influence on rappers is highly understated but thats another

post entirely:)

my favorite dilla get-busy verses:

thelonious

give it up

shake it down/dewit

raise it up

do ya thang

we gangsta

no games

game over

shotgun

f the police

wild

reunion

ice

da ruckus

door

the introduction

n#%* know

filth

all champion sound

and ruffdraft raps

am i missing anything?

Yeah I'm sorry for bitching about it in my post but it's something that really bugs me, and since we were talking about rapping and underappreciated rappers I had to vent out a bit. I don't discard him, it's just that I don't share the same sentiment the majority of the people happen to have about his rapping. Don't get me wrong there are some songs of his I like and I respect his career, but sometimes (well actually most of the time) people tend to overrate it. Anyways enough with the off-topic.

Yes you are missing the song I cited in my post, Platinum Pied Pipers - Act Like You Know (you can listen to it here http://www.undergroundhiphop.com/store/audio_player_store.asp?UPC=UBR1116612&TrackNumber=1), one of the best Dilla raps IMO.

'You know that, throwback, number two-three'....Love his basketball references.

Also, how can I forget the Love Junkee remix Dilla did...The way he orchestrated his verse is just crazy.

Can somebody help me with something though? I know there's a line Dilla drops in a song which goes 'we Tear Da Club up like 3-6 Mafia', does anyone remember the name of that song? I know I heard it once and even added it to my favorites on YouTube but I can't find it anymore.

EDIT: I'd also add his verses from Que D's 'Supa Shit' and ATCQ's 'That Shit' to your list. He flowing like a river on those tracks.

EDIT2:I just noticed that 'Baby' and 'Won't Do' are missing from your list....he spittin' fire on those tracks.

'Whole body blingin' like 3-P-O, n***a'

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sounds like your gripe is more w/ the bandwagon, mindless consumer conditioned to adore Pac based on his romanticized legacy and not Pac as an artist… one could argue Dilla rhymed about the same things that Pac did… I respect your perspective though

Anywho, I totally agree on Dilla being a nasty emcee… now that I think about it, he rhymed w/ the precision of an engineer in some ways. He didn't have the most dense verses ever but his swing (vocally) was up there… it's hard to explain

I like some of the subliminal shots he threw @ Eminem and Shoes on tracks like "Reunion" (Slum Village) and "Strapped" (Jaylib) respectively: "all of my peeps that rep for D than 12 Eminems" <-- that line's super ill

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sounds like your gripe is more w/ the bandwagon, mindless consumer conditioned to adore Pac based on his romanticized legacy and not Pac as an artist… one could argue Dilla rhymed about the same things that Pac did… I respect your perspective though

I'd say it's both. You are right though, I absolutely despise it when people can't form an opinion of their own by contemplating and examining the subject. In a certain way that's how I feel about the whole mainstream music movement today: most of the people are satisfied with what they are being thrown at by radio stations (catchy, simple-minded, repetitive and unoriginal songs, which in a certain way reflect themselves), they don't have the will to scratch under the surface and explore the whole plethora of quality music they could be listening to, for a number of reasons: ignorance, inability to comprehend the artistic process behind some of the music they 'don't like' or deem 'stupid' (and in most cases haven't even listened to it, but they go along with whatever the masses say), no musical formation, and most importantly: not knowing the cultural (social) history of the times in which certain genres were born/evolved, because let's not forget, music IS art, it's the reflection of how people were feeling in a certain time and place and what caused them to feel that way and most importantly what they are trying to communicate through it.

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I guess i never really thought of Dilla as an all time lyricist but if he's riding over a nice beat then its going to sound great.

While on the flip side theres a lot of amazing mcs who sound nice rapping over very minimal or just downright simple beats

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Dilla's rapping has always been sick and next-level. The problem is the the features...

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I guess i never really thought of Dilla as an all time lyricist but if he's riding over a nice beat then its going to sound great.

While on the flip side theres a lot of amazing mcs who sound nice rapping over very minimal or just downright simple beats

I wouldn't say it's like that. Take 'Ruff Draft' as an example: he is basically rapping over loops, rather simple loops. However, the way he created them makes them sound amazing, it's like you don't even notice it's a loop. Yet he keeps you entertained with his more-than-on-point rhymes.

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I'd say it's both. You are right though, I absolutely despise it when people can't form an opinion of their own by contemplating and examining the subject. In a certain way that's how I feel about the whole mainstream music movement today: most of the people are satisfied with what they are being thrown at by radio stations (catchy, simple-minded, repetitive and unoriginal songs, which in a certain way reflect themselves), they don't have the will to scratch under the surface…

I agree in large part… I guess I don't care to explore that any longer. I used to haven an issue w/ people subscribing to Top 40 and not giving anything outside of those parameters a chance but I realized that most time devoted to that was time wasted… I'd rather take that time and energy to give a record another spin or do some digging. There's something to be appreciated and learned from literally every record, genre, category, appeal, consumer, demographic, etc… so I try to steer clear from being overly critical of any one person's creation or preferences.

I've been to a shit ton of hip-hop shows where all people wanna do is perpetrate and I've also been to a few country shows where people people just have fun… I don't even listen to country but I can appreciate that energy

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Dilla's rapping has always been sick and next-level. The problem is the the features...

Frank & Dank literally wasted some of Dilla's illest shit ever, LMAOOO. You know Dilla was a loyal dude when he kept sending his in-house cast some of that fire knowing damn well some other cats woulda made magic w/ them. That said, there's something beautiful about a wack emcee on a ill beat sometimes… not necessarily saying F&D are wack… but they're not super nice neither

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Frank & Dank literally wasted some of Dilla's illest shit ever, LMAOOO. You know Dilla was a loyal dude when he kept sending his in-house cast some of that fire knowing damn well some other cats woulda made magic w/ them. That said, there's something beautiful about a wack emcee on a ill beat sometimes… not necessarily saying F&D are wack… but they're not super nice neither

lol yeah...let's just leave it at that.

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love junkee rmx,baby, and won't do are definitely good ones with many quotables

but i consider them girl raps.

as for "act like you know", i left that off the list in favor of shotgun and the fact that part of the 2nd verse reappears

on "thrilla" but definitely stand corrected:) definitely preferred the wajeed remix on the war mixtape.
i also failed to mention the likes of the fourtet remix and the OX boom boom joint.

my bad

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love junkee rmx,baby, and won't do are definitely good ones with many quotables

but i consider them girl raps.

as for "act like you know", i left that off the list in favor of shotgun and the fact that part of the 2nd verse reappears

on "thrilla" but definitely stand corrected:) definitely preferred the wajeed remix on the war mixtape.

i also failed to mention the likes of the fourtet remix and the OX boom boom joint.

my bad

oh yeah the oxtopus boom boom joint is fire

Frank & Dank literally wasted some of Dilla's illest shit ever, LMAOOO. You know Dilla was a loyal dude when he kept sending his in-house cast some of that fire knowing damn well some other cats woulda made magic w/ them. That said, there's something beautiful about a wack emcee on a ill beat sometimes… not necessarily saying F&D are wack… but they're not super nice neither

I kind of agree but at the same time disagree....I know Frank & Dank are far from being great rappers but the energy they bring to a Dilla beats keeps me hooked on to it...don't know how to explain it really. I mean I enjoy listening to their stuff, even though I know it's far from being a lyrical masterpiece.

There's this interview Dilla did in the Netherlands (which I'm sure all of you have seen) where he explains it perfectly, he says that he doesn't consider them the greates MCs, but the vibe and energy he gets working with them makes it easy, they both on their grind:

@7:40
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Wow I just realized the beat for DIlla's track 'The Diary', produced by Bink (for those that have heard the 2008 album leak), has actually been used by GZA on his 'Legend of The Liquid Sword' album for the track 'Animal Planet':

Nonetheless Dilla murdered it!!

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There's this interview Dilla did in the Netherlands (which I'm sure all of you have seen) where he explains it perfectly, he says that he doesn't consider them the greates MCs, but the vibe and energy he gets working with them makes it easy, they both on their grind:

I think I've watched that interview 15x… lol. I remember him saying that… I definitely understand… good point

Wow I just realized the beat for DIlla's track 'The Diary', produced by Bink (for those that have heard the 2008 album leak), has actually been used by GZA on his 'Legend of The Liquid Sword' album for the track 'Animal Planet':

Great find… my guess is that w/e the sample is (drums and everything), is really intact which is why the two sound nearly identical… not to mention the fact that Bink produced both records. Dilla definitely MURDERED this beat though. When I first got on Twitter forever ago I remember reaching out to Bink to ask him a couple questions about collabing w/ Dilla. He replied to a handful of my questions really quickly…it was as if he was eager to get those thoughts out there… I wonder if he'd even done an interview about that before… it was awesome. I wish I still had access to that exchange… @ one point I got into deleting all my posts so that whole conversation's long gone. Anywho, I remember him saying that for Dilla to hand select him was an "honor." He was super humble and grateful for that recognition. If you think about it, what better nod could one possibly earn as a producer than a scenario like that… where the dopest producer comes to YOU for beats.

Some of the hardest raps Dilla ever recorded have to be the vocals on "The Introduction" off of The Diary. I was @ Stones Throw's 20th anniversary show (PBW, J. Rocc and MNDSGN) in Miami last night and when the opening DJ played that track… wowwww

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lol yeah...let's just leave it at that.

Speaking of which… I would really like to hear that 48hrs was like before Dilla reworked it and went the no-sample route. Up until recent, I was under the impression that the original concept for the album was to do a collection of songs w/o samples, but I read or heard in an interview that it was originally sample-based, but then Dilla went back and reworked it. Must have been suuuperr dope

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Great find… my guess is that w/e the sample is (drums and everything), is really intact which is why the two sound nearly identical… not to mention the fact that Bink produced both records. Dilla definitely MURDERED this beat though. When I first got on Twitter forever ago I remember reaching out to Bink to ask him a couple questions about collabing w/ Dilla. He replied to a handful of my questions really quickly…it was as if he was eager to get those thoughts out there… I wonder if he'd even done an interview about that before… it was awesome. I wish I still had access to that exchange… @ one point I got into deleting all my posts so that whole conversation's long gone. Anywho, I remember him saying that for Dilla to hand select him was an "honor." He was super humble and grateful for that recognition. If you think about it, what better nod could one possibly earn as a producer than a scenario like that… where the dopest producer comes to YOU for beats.

Some of the hardest raps Dilla ever recorded have to be the vocals on "The Introduction" off of The Diary. I was @ Stones Throw's 20th anniversary show (PBW, J. Rocc and MNDSGN) in Miami last night and when the opening DJ played that track… wowwww

That's dope man! Actually, mass appeal released a series of videos regarding The Diary in which they interview some of the collaborators (Snoop Dogg, K Riggins, and one featuring Bink & nottz) on Dilla, how they met up, etc. and Bink says exactly what he told you:

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Speaking of which… I would really like to hear that 48hrs was like before Dilla reworked it and went the no-sample route. Up until recent, I was under the impression that the original concept for the album was to do a collection of songs w/o samples, but I read or heard in an interview that it was originally sample-based, but then Dilla went back and reworked it. Must have been suuuperr dope

I have a version which has most of the original, sample-made tracks off the 48hrs album.

And yes the original idea for the album was to use popular samples, obviously with them being flipped the Dilla way.

The label (also MCA at the time) obviously reluctant to pay for the sample clearances, probably didn't deem it profitable enough, so they rejected this version. Dilla was pissed about it so him and F&D made an almost sample-free version (with the exception of the 'Ma Dukes' track) of it in 2 days I think (that's why it was called 48 Hours) and resubmitted it, but the album was ultimately shelved. That's what inspired Frank and Dank and Dilla to make the 'MCA' track (Music Cemetery of America).

For example the original version of "Where the Parties At?" contains a sample I'm sure all of you will recognize:

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That's dope man! Actually, mass appeal released a series of videos regarding The Diary in which they interview some of the collaborators (Snoop Dogg, K Riggins, and one featuring Bink & nottz) on Dilla, how they met up, etc. and Bink says exactly what he told you:

I watched this recently but this is a new thing. I reached out to him years ago… 3 or 4 maybe, not sure

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I have a version which has most of the original, sample-made tracks off the 48hrs album.

And yes the original idea for the album was to use popular samples, obviously with them being flipped the Dilla way.

For example the original version of "Where the Parties At?" contains a sample I'm sure all of you will recognize:

never heard this… good shit! S/O to you for knowing the history… shady ass industry

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never heard this… good shit! S/O to you for knowing the history… shady ass industry

Yeah I added an explanation to my post regarding the situation, I've read it somewhere online, but here it is once again:

The label (also MCA at the time) obviously reluctant to pay for the sample clearances, probably didn't deem it profitable enough, so they rejected this version. Dilla was pissed about it so him and F&D made an almost sample-free version (with the exception of the 'Ma Dukes' track) of it in 2 days I think (that's why it was called 48 Hours) and resubmitted it, but the album was ultimately shelved. That's what inspired Frank and Dank and Dilla to make the 'MCA' track (Music Cemetery of America).

It's tracks like these ('Where The Parties At?') that make me appreciate Frank and Dank - it's real street shit with no intentions of being something they ain't + they deliver a nice flow every now and then. Nothing fancy lyrically but still something you can kick back to and just let go.

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Yeah I added an explanation to my post regarding the situation, I've read it somewhere online, but here it is once again:

The label (also MCA at the time) obviously reluctant to pay for the sample clearances, probably didn't deem it profitable enough, so they rejected this version. Dilla was pissed about it so him and F&D made an almost sample-free version (with the exception of the 'Ma Dukes' track) of it in 2 days I think (that's why it was called 48 Hours) and resubmitted it, but the album was ultimately shelved. That's what inspired Frank and Dank and Dilla to make the 'MCA' track (Music Cemetery of America).

Thanks again, dude… you answered a lot of the questions I had regarding the project. Considering all the tributes and appearances F&D make, I feel like their story is largely untold. Just them… no other Dilla affiliates around… there's a lot we don't know. Occasionally I'll go on Discogs to look for the 12" singles F&D have w/ Dilla production but haven't pulled the trigger just yet. Would be nice to have that suite @ some point. I fxck w/ them…like I said… one can't help to think what could have been w/ some of those beats but I definitely respect the energy and dissonant flow. It's the type of shxt you'd hear if your boys were rhyming, you know? They have that vibe

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Thanks again, dude… you answered a lot of the questions I had regarding the project. Considering all the tributes and appearances F&D make, I feel like their story is largely untold. Just them… no other Dilla affiliates around… there's a lot we don't know. Occasionally I'll go on Discogs to look for the 12" singles F&D have w/ Dilla production but haven't pulled the trigger just yet. Would be nice to have that suite @ some point. I fxck w/ them…like I said… one can't help to think what could have been w/ some of those beats but I definitely respect the energy and dissonant flow. It's the type of shxt you'd hear if your boys were rhyming, you know? They have that vibe

I've just found this on YouTube:

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Another mediocre feature but doesn't matter when Jaylib is in effect.Would've preferred another Dilla verse on it or some vocal samples til the fadeout.

Snoop and Nas over Dilla beats should be momentous events, however in 2016 it's simply not the case. Either way,Dilla gets busy and makes both features seem lackluster.

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We're all Madlib fans here, but c'mon really?

yea… far from a troll. Who wants to hear Nas talking about investments and stocks ever… much less on a Madlib track w/ Dilla on the other side… no thanks. I'd rather here F&D scream on the track than that pretentious talk.

I like "The Season" better

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Agreed on The Season.

To tell you the truth, and I'm not defending Nas's Sickness verse. Still, Madlib was never the greatest rapper[…]

cue the Madlib's an underrated emcee exchange… I'm w/ it. I remember Madlib saying he was a little insecure about how he sounded on the mic… I wish he'd rhyme more.

"I got it down to a t (tea) like Lipton"… fireee

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yea… far from a troll. Who wants to hear Nas talking about investments and stocks ever… much less on a Madlib track w/ Dilla on the other side… no thanks. I'd rather here F&D scream on the track than that pretentious talk.

I like "The Season" better

Nas has been on that for some time now.

Dunno what to call it, but it's the formula he's been rolling with.

The worst is when he raps over good beats and ends up spitting

a rushed/unfocused verse. The sensitive richboy brag/international socialite raps

are a far cry from the Nas we all once knew. Here's to hoping he gets his rap patterns

and content back up to proper form.

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